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Quantum Information Science and Quantum Control

 I. Coordinator:

  • Prof. Yeong-Cherng Liang (NCKU) and Prof. Guin-Dar Lin (NTU)
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II. Core Members:

  • Core members
  • Prof. Guang-Yin Chen (NCHU), Prof. Yueh-Nan Chen (NCKU), Prof. Chung-Hsien Chou (NCKU), Prof. Hsi-Sheng Goan (NTU), Prof. Zheng-Yao Su (NCHC), Prof. Wei-Min Zhang (NCKU)
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  • Young participants
  • Dr. Hong-Bin Chen (NCKU), Mr. Yun-Yi Hsieh (NTU), Dr. Chia-Hsien Huang (NTU), Dr. Chia-Yi Ju (NCHU), Mr. Huan-Yu Ku (NCKU), Mr. Kuan-Ting Lin (NTU), Mr. Pei-Sheng Lin (NCKU), and Dr. Gelo Tabia (NTHU/NCKU).
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  • Justification for having more than 6 core members
  • The proposed thematic group inherits the line-up of the existing thematic group on Quantum Information Science and Quantum Control (TG6). The team has worked well together in the past and would like to continue its current lineup.
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III.
Research Themes:

  • Quantum information science (QIS) is a burgeoning, multidisciplinary research area that attracts worldwide experts from physics, mathematics, computer science, and information theory etc. A primary goal of the research program is to harness features unique to quantum systems to perform task that are otherwise impossible, or could only be performed in a much less efficient manner in a world where we only have access to classical resources. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in our ability to prepare, to manipulate, and to control quantum systems, thus paving the way to experimentally realize many of the splendid theoretical proposals. Yet, there remain obstacles to be overcome, and even our understandings of the implications of the underlying physical theories are arguably limited.

    The main mission of this thematic group is thus to provide a platform to facilitate communications and discussions among researchers working in these areas in Taiwan, with the aim of making solid progress to advance our understanding, and to devise/ realize applications thereof. Through this platform and the activities organized, we hope to enhance not only collaborations among domestic scholars, but also provide opportunities for them to get connected with international links. Research topics that may promote the collaboration and research of the core members are listed below.
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  • (1) Quantum correlations in space, time & their applications
  • Quantum systems may differ from classical ones by exhibiting correlations between spatially separated, or temporally separated measurement outcomes that have no classical analogue. The former observation has led to the development of device-independent quantum information and their variants, and hence the possibility to perform quantum information processing using untrusted devices. Similarly, the latter feature of quantum system has manifested itself in the non-macrorealistic nature of quantum systems, the possibility of performing temporal steering, as well as the possibility to certify the quantumness of a channel. The goals here would be to further expand our understanding of these phenomena and to find applications of them in quantum information and other disciplines in physics.
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  • Theoretical Collaborations: Y.-N. Chen and Y.-C. Liang
  • Experimental Collaboration: C.-M. Li (NCKU).
  • International Collaborations: F. Buscemi (Univ. Nagoya, Japan), N. Lambert (Riken, Japan), F. Nori (Riken, Japan), and N. Gisin (Univ. Geneva, Switzerland).
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  • (2) Quantum thermodynamics
  • Classical thermodynamics was formulated under the premises of classical physics, where genuine quantum features are not taken into account. In addition, system-bath interactions are typically assumed to be negligible compared to the energies of the system and the bath. Naturally, one may ask to what extent the laws of thermodynamics would have to be revised when genuine quantum features, in particular coherence and entanglement, are taken into account. To this end, we will make use of tools developed, e.g., in quantum information theory to gain insights on these fundamental questions. Evidently, progress on this will shed light on how the classical world may have emerged from the interactions between physical systems and their environment.
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  • Theoretical Collaborations: C.-H. Chou, Y.-C. Liang, and W.-M. Zhang
  • International Collaborations: A. Acín (ICFO, Spain), N. Brunner (Univ. Geneva, Spain), and R. Renner (ETH Zürich, Switzerland).
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  • (3) Open quantum system dynamics
  • The fact that all physical systems are never perfectly isolated means that a solid understanding of the dynamics of open quantum systems is crucial if we want to complete a quantum information processing task over an extended period of time. The problem becomes especially complicated when the system behaves in a non-Markovian manner, i.e., if information back flows from the environment to the system, or when there already exists system-environment correlation even prior to the evolution of the joint system. Characterizing non-Markovian processes, and understanding how the presence of initial system-environment affects our physical description of open quantum system will be the focus of this part of the project.
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  • Theoretical Collaborations: Y.-N. Chen, C.-H. Chou, H.-S. Goan, Z.-Y. Su, and W.-M. Zhang
  • International Collaborations: K. Modi (Univ. Melbourne, Australia).
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  • (4) Quantum interfacing and hybrid systems
  • Scalable quantum information processing concerns not only the number of qubits in a single physical device but also the compatibility between different ones. How to faithfully exchange quantum information among various physical degrees of freedom contributes to an extremely crucial task for quantum interface, transducer, large scale computing, and network. By combining and engineering advantages of different physical platforms, ranging from atomic systems, optical devices, solid-state realizations, to macroscopic oscillators, we are able to explore new phenomena and possible applications. For this part of the project, we will mainly focus on the bridging mechanisms among atomic systems, Nitrogen-vacancy centers, optical photons, superconducting circuits, and optomechanical systems. 
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  • Theoretical Collaborations: G.-Y. Chen, Y.-N. Chen, H.-S. Goan, and G.-D. Lin.
  • International Collaborations: G. Milburn (Univ. Queensland, Australia), F. Nori (Japan), J. Twamley (Macquarie Univ., Australia), and S.F. Yelin (Harvard, USA).
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  • (5) Fault-tolerant and/or robust quantum computation
  • A well-known application of quantum theory in information processing lies on quantum computation. Although impressive experimental progress has recently been made, there remain obstacles that need to be overcome before we can witness the superiority of quantum computers over their classical counterpart. Among which is the lack of a precise control of quantum gate operations – an essential ingredient in fault-tolerant quantum computation. To this end, we will (i) investigate the feasibility of robust quantum operations (ii) exploit the mathematical framework of quotient algebra partition to improve the existing scaling for fault-tolerant quantum computation and (iii) investigate the prospects of topological quantum computation.
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  • Theoretical Collaborations: H.-S. Goan, Y.-C. Liang, Z.-Y. Su, and W.-M. Zhang
  • International Collaborations: A. Dzurak (Univ. New South Wales, Australia), and A. Fedorov (Univ. Queensland, Australia).
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  • (6) Quantum simulation & machine learning
  • Quantum simulators are devices designed to study the behavior of specific, difficult-to-control quantum systems via the engineering of other quantum systems. They not only allow us to gain further insights on the nature of quantum systems, but may also find practical applications, e.g., in drug designs. Here, we plan to investigate non-Hermitian systems with parity-time (PT) symmetry, many-body entanglement generations with non-Hermitian processes, and exchange interactions in an ensemble of different dimensions. Meanwhile, investigation of machine learning on quantum computers – studying how this concept can be used as tools for better quantum control – has drawn growing interest recently. In this spirit, we plan to explore the idea of open quantum neural networks based on dissipative quantum computing.
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  • Theoretical Collaborations: G.-Y. Chen, Y.-N. Chen, H.-S. Goan, G.-D. Lin.
  • Experimental Collaboration: M.-S. Chang & Y.-C. Chen (IAMS, AS), C.-S. Chuu & I.C. Hoi (NTHU), & C.-S. Wu (NCUE).
  • International Collaborations: M.-H. Hsieh (Univ. Tech. Sydney, Australia), A.
  • Miranowicz (AMU, Poland), F. Nori (Japan), T. Stace (Univ. Queensland, Australia), J. Twamley (Australia), and S. F. Yelin (USA).
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IV. Activities:

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  • Activities in 2019 Activities in 2020 Remarks
    Mini-workshops/schools
    (one-day), and regular
    biweekly (non-regular)
    seminars at NCKU (NTU)
    Mini-workshops/schools
    (one-day), and regular
    biweekly (non-regular)
    seminars at NCKU (NTU)
    Seminar: to expose the
    community to recent
    developments; educational,
    and informative
    Discussion meetings among
    the core members and young
    researchers.
    Discussion meetings among
    the core members and young
    researchers.
    To be held biweekly,
    monthly or quarterly
    depending on situations.
    International Workshop and/
    or School on Quantum
    Information Science or
    related areas
    Asia-Pacific Conference/
    Workshop on Quantum
    Information Science
    (APCQIS)
    APCWQIS is a conference
    held yearly or biyearly in
    different countries in the
    Asia-Pacific region
    Invitation of international
    visitors and collaborators
    Invitation of international
    visitors and collaborators
    Including speakers for
    international workshops
    Research visits by domestic
    researchers
    Research visits by domestic
    researchers
    Including experimental
    colleagues
    Young researcher forum on
    Quantum Info. Science
    Young researcher forum on
    Quantum Info. Science
    Targeting mostly advanced
    students and postdocs
    Attending international
    conferences and visits to
    international collaborators
    Attending international
    conferences and visits to
    international collaborators
    Core members, advanced
    students and postdocs



V. Expected achievements:

  • We expect to develop theoretical frameworks and/or useful toolboxes for quantum correlations, quantum control, open system dynamics, and quantum thermodynamics. Based on these findings, we expect to contribute towards the realization of quantum information processing protocols as well as other applications. We further expect to establish a steady collaborative relationship within the core members, with other local experts, and with leading international groups on these research topics. Strengthened ties with experimental groups can also be expected. Through engagements in cuttingedge research projects as well as the active participations in discussions, seminars, schools, international workshops and conferences, talented students and postdocs are expected to receive world-class training, and thus become ready to undertake even more complicated challenges in the future. As a direct consequence of the operation of the thematic group, we expect to produce high-quality publications in international peer-reviewed journals between core members and collaborators to promote the international visibility and reputation of NCTS toward research excellence.

 


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